Whole PTH Detection Service

PTH has both catabolic and anabolic actions on the bone. Bone turnover is under PTH control, and appears to be best reflected by a balance of circulating PTH-(1–84) and C-PTH fragments. When predominant, the former tends to promote bone turnover while the latter has an opposing antagonistic effect. Creative BioMart Biomarker is capable to provide our customers with superior PTH detection service, various detection methods ensuring high sensitivity for detecting biomarkers in different samples with different concentrations.

Introduction

Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a peptide secreted by the parathyroid glands containing 84-amino acid, the 1-34 N-terminal fragment is the biological activity resides. Bone is a classic target tissue of PTH. PTH is a hormone with opposing effects on bone. Bone turnover, including activation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, is regulated by PTH, appears to be best reflected not by the absolute concentration of PTH, but by the balance of circulating full-length PTH and the C-PTH fragment of PTH. The function of endogenous PTH is to maintain normal extracellular calcium level by increasing gastrointestinal calcium absorption, renal calcium and phosphate reabsorption, and osteoclast reabsorption thereby releasing calcium from the bones.

Whole PTH Detection ServiceFigure 1. PTH regulatory pathway.

A low serum calcium level (↓Ca) can stimulate the kidneys to convert 25-OHD to 1,25-(OH)2D and stimulate parathyroid secretion of PTH. Elevation of PTH (↑PTH) further promotes the conversion of 25-OHD to 1,25-(OH)2D, promotes an increased urine phosphorus (↑Pu), resulting in a decrease of serum phosphate (↓P). PTH and 1,25-(OH)2D can also cause bone resorption to elevate serum calcium (↑Ca). Increased 1,25-(OH)2D increases the release of FGF23 in the bone, which increases urine phosphorus and produces low serum phosphorus. An increase of 1,25-(OH)2D also enhances calcium absorption and serum calcium levels. FGF23 will reduce the conversion of 25-OHD to 1,25-(OH)2D and increase 24,25-(OH)2D. The increased serum calcium levels will restore normocalcemia and inhibit further release of PTH. From a clinical perspective, understanding and assessing the level of PTH is a means of assessing the state of bone turnover in a patient. Besides, in an experimental model of ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis, intermittent PTH treatment increases osteoblast activity, resulting in bone mass recovery and increased mechanical strength.

Application of PTH

  • PTH levels in serum and plasma have been measured to assess bone turnover, detect diseases such as predominant hyperparathyroid bone disease (osteitis fibrosa), mixed uraemic osteodystrophy, low turnover uraemic osteodystrophy and so on.

Our Advantages

  • Accept a wide range of sample types (serum, plasma)
  • Ensure high sensitivity for detecting PTH in different samples
  • Ensure high accuracy and repeatable PTH detection
  • Ensure a wide kinetic range to detect samples of different concentrations
  • Short experimental period

Workflow of PTH Detection at Creative BioMart Biomarker

Creative BioMart Biomarker strictly controls each specific experimental step in the PTH detection procedure to ensure high sensitivity, high accuracy and repeatable PTH detection.

Whole PTH Detection Service

Please feel free to contact us if you would like to know more about PTH detection. At Creative BioMart Biomarker, we not only provide high sensitivity, high accuracy and repeatable PTH detection service, but also provide detection services for other biomarkers. Additionally, our experts can also provide and help design the best solution according to your specific requirements.

References:

  1. Ellegaard, M.; et al. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing. Calcif Tissue Int. 2010, 87:1-13.
  2. Malluche, H.H.; et al. Influence of the parathyroid glands on bone metabolism. European Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2006, 36: 23-33.
  3. Goltzman D. Functions of vitamin D in bone. Histochemistry and Cell Biology. 2018, doi:10.1007/s00418-018-1648-y.

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